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Best Student Phone Plan in Vancouver

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ATTN Students in Canada – Save on your student phone plans. Find out The BEST student phone plan available in Vancouver, BC.

If you’re arriving in Vancouver for your studies this year or if you’re looking for a competitive student phone plan to switch towards, we hope this resource will help you.

TL;DR/101 => We have taken careful consideration to finding the best student phone plan in Vancouver, and Canada at large. It’s hard to go wrong with these choices when looking for student phone plans in Canada.

(1) Rogers Student Phone Plan – 1 GB data, 300 local weekday minutes, unlimited international texting, Perk: Rogers’ NHL Live, GamePlus, Perk: 6 months free Spotify @ $70 per month.

=> Click here to sign up online to Rogers’ 1 GB Share-Everything phone plan!

(2) Fido (Rogers) Student Phone Plan – 1 GB data, 500 minutes Canada-wide calling, unlimited international texting @ $55/month

=> Click here to sign up online to Fido’s 1 GB Data-Text-Talk student phone plan.

(Fido Pulse Plan at $65/month for 1 GB data, unlimited Canada-wide calling, unlimited international texting, Perk: 5 hours free data, Perk: 6 months free Spotify, Perk: Fido Roam if you love travelling!)

=> Click here to sign up online to Fido’s 1 GB Pulse phone plan!

(3) Koodo (Telus) Student Phone Plan – 1 GB data, 500 minutes Canada-wide calling,  unlimited international texting @ $55/month

(Koodo Mobile plan at $65 for 1 GB data, unlimited Canada-wide calling, unlimited international texting. No perks like Fido however… just unlimited Canada-wide calling for $10 more.)

=> Click here to sign up online to Koodo’s 1 GB Data-Text-Talk phone plan.

(4) Virgin Mobile (Bell) Student Phone Plan – 1 GB data, 500 minutes Canada-wide calling, unlimited international texting, Perk: “member’s benefits” retail discounts, Perk: myPeeps @ $55/month.

(Virgin Mobile plan at $65 for 1 GB data, unlimited Canada-wide calling, unlimited international texting. Same retail perks as the $55/month plan. Virgin Mobile Canada partners with a variety of brands in fashion, travel, food, and entertainment to provide discounts for their members such as 2 for 1 ticket at Cineplex or $20 off Running Room.)

=> Click here to sign up online to Virgin Mobile’s student phone plan! 

(5) Freedom Mobile (Shaw/Wind Mobile) Student Phone Plan – 2 GB data, unlimited Canada-wide calling, unlimited Canada+US texting @ $40/month.

(Freedom Mobile offers a Big Gig plan at $50 for 10 GB data, with pay per use talk at $0.05/minute, and unlimited international texting.

Customer service and network reliability is another question however! Hopefully, their customer service and network will improve with time…however, much like choosing a boyfriend/girlfriend – don’t find someone hoping to change them unless you want to be disappointed. You cannot sign up for phone plans online with Freedom Mobile – you have to visit a kiosk or store if you want to sign up.)

Click here to view Freedom Mobile phone plans!

 

Summary: As you observe, cellphone companies do their best to remain competitive with similar plans pricing. Most of these plans listed above includes voicemail, call display, and unlimited evenings and weekend calling but be sure to verify the plan’s details and fine-print on their site or in-store before signing up!

Since prices are relatively similar at the Big 3 cellular service providers and then comparatively at the discount subsidiary brands… the competition and main inflection point lies with customer service (crucially important) and network reception.

Rogers and Fido excels in customer service (from first hand experience) with reliable (straight-forward/frank) billing, helpful customer reps – specifically their Montreal support center, and various ways of contact. Comparatively, many have voiced frustration about Virgin Mobile’s “mistakes” which end up costing customers more along with questionable billing issues. (Apparently, customer service representatives may accidentally switch your plan when you call in for support – you can’t revert promotional discounts – and leave you paying more.) Freedom Mobile is the only carrier on the list that you may face issues with network reliability/reception but there is potential. It could definitely be a contender in the wireless industry – the Big 4 – but the network is still sorely lacking at the moment unless you’re only in their downtown core areas. (which if you are, by all means…save the money.) Koodo has the same prices as Rogers’ but not quite as good in customer service or value-added benefits. They also do not have online chat support option available which will be a huge time saver if you need to change your plans or inquire about their service.

Why focus on customer support? Your time is important, don’t waste it on a cellphone company’s customer support funnel or get frustrated when you are billed more than you should! Save the hassle. Choose a cellphone plan with reliable customer support while being competitively priced, which is why Rogers’ is currently at #1 on our student phone plan in Vancouver recommendations – whether you’re a student or not actually. (…and the current service provider we use.)

 

That’s pretty much all you need to know about student phone plans in Vancouver. If you want to read an essay about Canadian student phone plans then keep reading. The information bellow is mainly for keeners (the slang, not actual definition) and search engines.

 

Discussion Questions (10 Marks Total): There are generally only few options available for cellular service in Vancouver, BC or Canada for that matter relative to other countries like Britain. A few years ago, the government of Canada, tried to increase competition by encouraging budget carriers to enter the market with their reserved spectrum auction.

(Optional Further Readings – for your reading pleasure

1 – as of 2015, new wireless service providers in Canada control 25% of the wireless spectrum relative to 2% in 2006, with 98% by the big 3 tel-com providers back in 2006. This was the result of an intentional move by the conservative government to introduce competition with cellular service providers and hence reduce prices for consumers. It has worked; introducing new national and regional players and forcing Bell, Rogers, and Telus – known as the big 3 incumbents – to reduce their cellphone plan prices. The process have significantly reduced the prices for student cellphone plans in Vancouver and Canada. An interesting read if you want to learn more about the inception of wireless service in Canada, the determined push to increase competition and reduce prices for consumers by reserving/giving spectrum to new players, or learn more about projected growth of wireless services in Canada.

2 – Following turbulent times for new cellphone providers in early 2015, Wind Mobile, was sold to Shaw in 2016, making it the 4th largest wireless network provider in Canada. The acquisition of Wind Mobile by Shaw and re-branding as Freedom Mobile provides Canadians and students like yourself with a viable competitor. Freedom Mobile plans to be investing into their current network quality with new spectrum and increasing the number of antennas in metro centres. Shaw have proven their commitment to being a serious contender within Canada’s wireless network options; shortly after announcing the purchase of Wind Mobile, Shaw had sold ViaWest (data centre company) for 1.675 billion with some of the proceeds to buy airwaves to boost Freedom Mobile.

3 – The Liberal government is planning to follow suite and reserve 40% of the new spectrum auction for smaller cellular providers such as Freedom Mobile and Videotron/Quebecor. This all makes to say that Freedom Mobile can be a very probable contender for student phone plans in Vancouver where competitive pricing is concerned. They certainly haven’t proven their reliability or customer service yet.

4 – See how prices for phone plans in Canada compare to various developed countries globally.

5 – An interesting article on Globe And Mail visualizing how wireless phone plans have been getting cheaper for students like yourself! Largely thanks to the Conservative Government’s move to increase competition in the oligopoly. Surprisingly, this initiative to increase competition wasn’t so popular among the public then.

“…Wall report as proof its policies on the wireless industry have led to lower prices since 2008, which was the first year the study was conducted as well as when Ottawa held an auction for cellular airwaves that reserved a certain amount for new players.”

“Finally, compared with prices paid in the U.S., Europe, Australia and Japan, the report found “Canada’s mobile wireless prices once again rank on the high side of the international group of countries included in the study.””)

1) Evaluate what increasing competition in the wireless industry means for you as the consumer? (5/10 Marks)

Understandably, the major cellphone service providers still provide better coverage and a full spectrum of services – overall value package with store accessibility, online platform/account management, and perks like free Spotify or content streaming. However, at least now you have lower cost cellphone plans for students and budget cellphone plan options available to you! The increase in competition have also notably resulted in better customer service and customer policies at the three incumbent cellular service providers in Canada such as Rogers.

2) Evaluate if the increased competition with student phone plans have been effective? Explain your reasons. (5/10 Marks)

This worked reasonably well in improving customer service, network performance, and reducing costs for consumers however Canada is still noted as one of the most expensive cellular service plans. The bigger firms also begun to purchase these smaller organizations. The government then proceeded to legislate some laws that helped consumers in this space such as maxing contract terms from three years to two years. (so cellular companies now can’t sign you on for three year plan with the incentive for a phone and then get you stuck on an expensive plan with horrendous service for three years. Notably, customer service has improved across the board.) These all have helped with the pricing of student cellphone plans in Canada and Vancouver however it still helps for you to know which cellphone companies excel in customer service, which cellphone companies provide the best value for their plans, and what are the perks or claw-backs of going with one network over another such as Freedom Mobile compared with Rogers?

 

The BEST Student Phone Plans in Vancouver:

So in the next few paragraph, we’ll be sharing our honest, non-sponsored, and genuine recommendation for the best student phone plan in Vancouver, BC or Canada for that matter. We hope it helps you make a decision, easier.

 

Rubric/Evaluations:

30% – Network Performance/Coverage: There’s little more frustration than not getting signal when you need it! What good is it paying for services you can’t use (because of bad reception) when you need it?

30% – Customer Service: We like to feel good. Good customer service can avoid spoiling your day and save you time. Time whether you’re a professional or student often seems too short. Last thing you want is wasting your time on call centers should you need them. Even worse when you get rude and obnoxious service.

20% – Prices: Prices are important but your time is more important. Most prices for cellphone plans do not deviate that much between the legacy providers (Big Three – Rogers, Telus, Bell). There is a significant price reduction for their subsidiary brands (Fido, Koodo, Virgin Mobile, ChatR) and then a significant price difference for the budget or newer cellular provider (Freedom Mobile). Most of the other new cellphone providers were acquired by the larger brands earlier such as Mobilicity rebranded as ChatR and acquired by Rogers.

Each cellphone plans provider recommended is listed with two plans currently available. It’s hard to determine your data usage; on average, cellphone users consume 2.9 GB of data monthly. There are likely two groups of student cellphone users…one that is cost-conscious individual who wants reliable service with data for apps (and Google searches), and two the tech-savvy student willing to splurge a little for more data toggled with WiFi usage to ensure seamless convenience, watching dog videos on Youtube/Facebook, or in class Google searches. (Can you believe Vancouver doesn’t have Uber yet?) Hence, for comparison we shared the current plans and prices available for a low-usage plan and for a higher usage plan.

10% Phones Available on Contract – Some people love to get the latest technology and the thought of getting a free phone. Phone plans today in Canada are limited to a two year contract (previously three) which means lesser phone subsidizing. Many budget cellphone providers like Freedom Mobile do not have access to certain phones such as the iPhone. Some budget cellphone providers such as Fido, Koodo, or Virgin Mobile have higher up-front prices for their contract phones despite being also on a two year contract. (Likely, as their profit margins are lower than the incumbent brands, they have to make up for it elsewhere. Still, they are a great choice with bring your own phone plans.)

10% Perks & Convenience -Perks are nice. Convenience also includes their online account management because as with most millennials and even beyond millennials, we do most of our banking and errands or cellphone plan management online.

 

1) Rogers: Rogers is the leading cellphone service provider in Canada. They have over 10 million subscribers in Canada for their prepaid and post-paid cellphone plans, with good reason. The rates are competitive to Canadian standards and not much farther from budget carriers when comparing the overall value of their services. Rogers have made their focus on (1) network and (2) customer service and it shows, which is why they score so highly among customers.

If you’re looking for a reliable student cellphone plan at an affordable price then your first choice would be Rogers if budget permits. If you’re willing to take some risk and dropped calls then Freedom Mobile would be the cheapest option on an LTE network.

(I am personally using Rogers’ on their “Share-Everything” plan and have been satisfied thus far with the customer service and coverage of their wireless service.)

Plan:

Low Data Usage – 500 MB Data & Unlimited Local Calling & Unlimited Texting @ $50/Month (No Tab)

High Data Usage – 1 GB Data & 300 Local Weekday Minutes & Unlimited Texting @ $70/Month (No Tab)

Coverage: With 10 million subscribers, you can be sure Rogers has one of the best cellphone coverage in Canada. They also have good roaming partnerships abroad with Roam like Home in United States. (at $5/day)

http://www.rogers.com/consumer/wireless/network-coverage

No concerns about coverage or receptivity during my three years using Rogers in Canada. The only time I had issues with data were underground like at Bentall Towers in Vancouver.

Service: Great customer service. Rogers have been focusing a lot on their customer service and investments to improve their network and it shows. They have one of the highest client retention in the country for cellphone plans. Of course, customer service depends on who you’re talking to – I have had frustrating customer service from Rogers in my three years of using Rogers as well but mostly positive.

Perks: Not many perks available with Rogers however you do get reliable student cellphone plans in Vancouver for a reasonable price. Great phone coverage and a broad selection of phones on contract. Certain Share Everything plan also provide free Spotify subscription and Texture (magazine) subscription for 6 months. If you’re a hockey fan you’ll enjoy the Rogers NHL Live and Game Plus. I think the excellent customer service (saving you time) and great connectivity/reception for fast WiFi is enough perks in itself.

Report Card/Transcript – 8.7/10

Network Performance (30%) = 10/10

  • As good as it comes in Canada. There isn’t much difference in coverage between Rogers, Telus, and Bell networks in Canada respectively. You only need to be concerned if you’re using a budget carrier – but they often have shared agreements with the legacy carriers.

Customer Service (30%) = 10/10

  • Reliable and effective customer service. Customer service options in store, by phone, or online live chat.
  • Online customer service and account management is a HUGE time saver.

Prices (20%) = 5/10

  • Not the best price for a low-entry plan. You would do better on Freedom Mobile if you’re budget conscious. However, reasonably competitive prices for the higher data cellphone plans.
  • There are no specific student plans or student discount however the prices are a competitive standard in Canada.

Phones (10%) = 9/10

  • iPhone and Android phones available on 2 year contract plans. Prices are competitive.

Perks & Convenience (10%) = 7/10

  • Get 6 months free Spotify subscription. Roam like Home, and NHL Live on selected Share-Everything plans. Not much other perks.
  • Exceptionally useful online account management tool. Monitor your data usage in real time and change your phone plan online.

 

2) Fido (Rogers): Our summary of Fido will be brief as its owned by Rogers as well. Meaning the network coverage is effectively the same as Rogers. Customer service is also responsive. The prices are slightly cheaper depending on your usage. Personally, I always prefer the legacy brand when the price difference isn’t significant; you can generally expect better customer support from the parent brand.

Plan:

Low Data Usage – 500 GB Data & 500 Minutes Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Canada Texting @ $45/Month (No Tab)

High Data Usage – 1 GB Data & Unlimited Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Canada Texting & 5 Hours Free Data @ $65/Month (No Tab)

++ 4 GB Data for the plan above is only $85/Month ($20 more for an extra 3 GB data)

Coverage: Same as Rogers.

Service: Reliable customer service with equally useful online account management as Rogers.

Perks: Dogs as mascot? Who doesn’t like dogs? Irrational people. Fido has some awesome perks however. The Fido Pulse plans (which is basically the Smart Phone plans with more data – Rogers also interestingly has two distinct levels of Share-everything Plan. Their higher data plan includes perks like free Spotify for 6 months which starts at their 10 GB data plan and their smaller Share-everything plan doesn’t. Fido is pretty much similar EXCEPT their Fido Pulse starts at the 1 GB Plan! So you get the perks like free Spotify for 6 Months with the 1 GB $65 Plan or the 4 GB $85 Plan or the 10 GB $115 Plan instead of the 10 GB $135 Plan at Rogers. Pretty sweet deal. The Fido brand is catered especially towards students it seems.) includes 5 hours of free data! Great when you’re on a long distant trip like taking the Grey Hound to Seattle on a long weekend break from school and looking to finish your latest TV series? There is also Fido Roam (same as Rogers’ Roam Like Home) that allows you to use your plan in US just as you would in Canada for just $5/day! Which means you can go exploring the Pike’s Place Market, Google Map your way to the original Starbucks and Google your way to the best food around Seattle. You can even scroll through your Facebook feed endlessly like you would at home in Canada! If you happen to be an Instagram Influencer, upload your pictures wherever you go so your followers know how cool you are and #humblebrag! Lastly, another perk with Fido Student phone plans in Vancouver is 6 months of free Spotify subscription. Save $9.99/month…actually $4.99/month with student discount and play the latest jam you love. (I prefer my jam on bread.) You gotta love that corporate America (and Canada) seem to love students with all these awesome deals and discounts for yourself! As we mentioned, great perks. Fido often also has some extra promotions running so check out the promos they have going which may mean extra data or an extra discount for you special students!

We really like the Fido Perks however still place Rogers at #1 because they are the parent brand to Fido. The prices are similar and it’s better to go with the legacy brand when the prices are similar as it typically means better and more well rounded support.

Report Card/Transcript – 8.4/10

Network Performance (30%) = 10/10

  • Same as Rogers. Same network, cheaper price.

Customer Service & Convenience (30%) = 7/10

  • Fewer retail locations.

Price (20%) = 7/10

  • Great value pricing for lower data usage.

Phones (10%) = 9/10

  • 27 phones available to choose from including iPhone SE, 6, 7, & 8 (Just two less than Rogers. Phones are much cheaper at Roger’s though due to a prevailing promotion. However phone selection is almost equal so we’ll keep it the same rating.)
  • If you’re going to go with a contract phone and can splurge some extra on utility then your best choice for a student phone plan would be to go with Rogers on their Share-everything plan above 10 GB (explanation bellow. Basically cheaper phones on contract at Rogers.) If you’re on a tighter budget but want service and network coverage and use your own phone then Fido is the better bang for your buck!

Perks (10%) = 10/10

  • Great perks listed above for the Fido Plus plan. 6 Months free Spotify, 5 Hours free data
  • Tag it with a promotion that Fido frequently runs (especially around September or December) and you got a great deal!

 

3) Koodo (Telus): Koodo is a brand that specifically targets students and budget pre-paid users but is owned by Telus and hence on the Telus network (which apparently is one of the fastest network in Canada – or so they say.) In terms of overall value, Fido and Rogers yield better value for their plans and their phones. Coverage is comparable to what you can expect from any of the legacy cellular brands like Rogers or Bell (which uses Telus network in Western Canada). Since these wireless network operators have invested heavily into improving their network performance with additional towers and spectrum, they are equally comparable in terms of coverage and speed. Rogers appears to have better coverage which is why we’ve listed it higher on the rankings for student phone plans – Rogers generally has better reception inside buildings base on customer opinions found online. In places where Rogers does not have coverage, they piggyback on Telus’ network under “Extended Coverage” which is no additional cost to you as the user. Telus does have faster performance on their networks however. On the flip side, people have reported incidents where friends using Rogers have full reception with little or no reception for those using Telus. The general consensus being, if you’re using one of the Big 3 cellular service providers in Vancouver, you should have little to no concerns about reception and consistency by-large however. Really, the key comparison is on customer service, convenience, perks, and plan value.

(In regards to speed, Telus may have faster downloads on data but I have never had any issues with data speed on Rogers’ LTE network. What’s important to me is reception in remote areas all throughout Vancouver’s lower mainland.)

Plan:

Low Data Usage – 500 MB Data & 500 Minutes Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Text @ $45/Month (No Tab)

High Data Usage – 1 GB Data & Unlimited Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Text @ $65/Month (No Tab)

++ 3 GB Data for the plan above is $85/Month ($20 more for an extra 2 GB data)

++ Koodo occasionally runs promotions, one currently ending Oct 11 which doubles your data (probably in competition to Freedom Mobile’s plan).

Coverage: Koodo runs on the Telus network. Hence, it does have the fastest data speed in Canada and very good coverage across the Vancouver lower mainland. Practically speaking, it does pail in comparison to coverage provided on Rogers’ network when on UBC by reported customer experience. As well, because Rogers’ has extended coverage that runs on the Telus network  (soft hand-over of calls and data) where their towers are not present, you can basically ensure the BEST of both worlds as a consumer. The wonder of competition benefiting Canadian consumers! It’s worth noting, during some fact-checking for this article, it appears this move was something initiated by the CRTC during Harper’s Conservative government push for increase competition in Canadian cellphone plans. The ruling on unjust and discriminating practice against smaller carriers for roaming reformed the wholesale roaming rates by the incumbent carriers paving way for the extended coverage policy by Rogers and Telus. Here’s your rights as a customer.

http://www.telus.com/en/ab/mobility/network/coverage-map.jsp

Service: Koodo does have a Telus Community Forum just as Rogers however they do not provide Live Chat option for customer support. (You must still call in and wait on the phone line or visit a store. Live Chat is convenient especially so because you can browse on your laptop or phone while waiting for a customer service representative. Further, everything is recorded and sent to your email upon request so you always have a reference of the discussion.)

Customer service at Koodo can certainly use some improvements. 127 negative experiences to 10 positive experiences reported isn’t a very good record. Not only is there a void of online chat support as Rogers and Fido conveniently provide BUT their phone support wait lines is understandably very long (apparently). It would appears their offer the lower costs by cutting customer service (which is never a good strategy in the long run – they would probably end up incurring more in customer acquisition and marketing costs to acquire a new customer than keep a happy customer. They would also have a higher amount of customers who leave and the customers who leave, leave angry…which then doesn’t do too well for their brand in social conversations which would then further push up their acquisition cost since they immediately disqualify a group of prospective customers who were turned off by the bad reviews from their friends/acquaintances. We humans are very social individuals, we like to share our experiences good or bad with our friends – you‘re our friends by the way; that’s inevitable. I digress.)

The combination of poor customer service and lack of technological time savers or convenient account management options hurts Koodo service performance. There’s nothing more annoying than bad or rude customer service that spoils your day …well even worse when you cannot get the help you need at all as some people have expressed using Koodo. There is a saving grace however it seems the prepaid plans are the ones where users have the most dissatisfaction and less so the post-paid.

Here are more reliable customer feedback from Koodo customers… BBB & TrustPilot reviews

Perks: Koodo offers minimal perks

Report Card/Transcript:

Network Performance (30%) = 9/10

  • Base on community chatter, it appears that while Telus does have faster network performance in most areas, Rogers by-large has better coverage across Canada 1 and 2. Rogers network also appears to penetrate buildings better than Telus networks. This is why we rated Telus slightly lower in network performance than Rogers. It isn’t so much the appearance on paper (with sponsored studies) but the practicality and value to the customer.
  • You won’t have much issues going with any of the Big 3 phone carriers in Canada however.

Customer Service & Convenience (30%) = 5/10

  • Customer service base on some review/complain sites have not been positive thus far.
  • Koodo and Telus does not have Live Chat option as Rogers and Fido does. (Time is the most valuable commodity, you don’t want to waste your time on the phone waiting to talk to someone in South America about your phone plan in Canada.)
  • Koodo does not have as robust an online account management system as Rogers.
  • It appears that as with a budget subsidiary of Telus, customer service at Koodo is also budget. (I’m thankful I don’t have to deal with their customer service after reading some of these articles online. The amount of time I’ve saved with Rogers has placed some huge customer loyalty. I remember reading a report a while back while travelling in Victoria, BC – good reception there too – that their strategy have been to focus on customer service to increase customer retention which seems to be coming out effectively.)

Price (20%) = 6/10

  • The price at Koodo isn’t as competitive as Fido’s prices when you factor in the value of perks like five hours of free data.

Phones (10%) = 8/10

  • Koodo has a lesser selection of phones available. They do have the iPhone 8 as well however.

Perks (10%) = 6/10

  • The main perk provided with Koodo is worry-free data meaning you won’t be charge overage fees from your plan.
  • Koodo doesn’t provide many additional perks for their customers except for the occasional promotions for new customers.

When you factor in the perks with Fido’s Plus Plans compared to Koodo such as the free five hours of data, Koodo certainly pails in comparison. Furthermore, the biggest pain is reports of bad customer service experience on Koodo’s service compared to Roger’s excellent service I’ve found thus far.

 

4) Virgin Mobile (Bell): Bell is Canada’s 3rd largest cellphone service provider in Canada just behind Telus, on number of cellphone plan subscribers nationally. In western Canada, Bell, tags upon Telus cellular network so you can expect the same range of coverage and network quality as Telus. With this said, Bell tends to also price their services higher than Rogers or Telus but Virgin Mobile is the student-orientated subsidiary brand that provides cellphone plans catered to students and budget cellphone users at a slightly discounted pricing to Bell’s. The customer service especially in kiosk stores are not as helpful as Rogers’ in my personal experience using Virgin Mobile plans several years ago before moving to Rogers. Virgin Mobile is owned by Bell. If you’re looking for a budget phone provider however you will do better with Fido than Virgin Mobile or Koodo  for customer service and overall experience in my opinion. Virgin Mobile offers some cool perks but doesn’t really compare to Fido’s consistency with customer service and overall value package. Freedom Mobile is yet to be tested.

Plan:

Low Data Usage – 500 MB Data & 500 Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Worldwide Text from Canada @ $45/Month (No Tab)

High Data Usage – 1 GB Data & Unlimited Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Worldwide Text from Canada @ $65/Month (No Tab)

++ 500 minutes of Canada-wide calling instead of unlimited on the High Data Usage plan is $10 cheaper at $55/Month.

Coverage: Virgin Mobile is a subsidiary of Bell and uses the same network as Bell. You have extensive coverage Canada-Wide from coast to coast. You should have no concerns about coverage with any of the Big 3 carriers and their subsidiary brands.  There are slight variances in Extended Coverage for the real budget brands such as Public Mobile (Telus) or ChatR (Rogers). With this said, Virgin Mobile has the same network coverage as Bell customers. In Western Canada, most of the towers which Bell uses is owned by Telus. Some customers have reported that their experience on Telus network was quicker and more reliable than Virgin Mobile despite being the same towers that Bell uses; the cellphone tower is the same hardware but the back-end of the network is different for Bell and Telus.

http://www.virginmobile.ca/en/support/coverage-maps.html

Service: Customer Service at Virgin Mobile Canada tries to follow the Virgin brand with emphasis on customer service. The customer service is not as positive as Rogers’ but neither is it as bad as Freedom Mobile. You can find a spotty mix of positive reviews on BBB.org

Virgin Mobile does provide online chat support similar to Fido and Rogers’ however which is a huge time saver. You can also get support at their kiosk which would be great for technical questions – although Virgin Mobile has limited kiosks. If you call into their phone support, you may be put on hold for a few minutes and depending on your customer support inquiry, may require several transfers.

Presuming you never have to contact customer support, you have reliable coverage and consistent billing, however if you need to contact customer service expect to take a chance at getting inexperience service. It appears some of their customer service team is under-trained or careless on occasion. If you have any issues with your phone bill, Virgin Mobile Canada appears to be rather inflexible on your plan. Basically, it appears they are quick to tell customers they can’t help them.

Several customer complaints consistently shared a human-error by their call centre reps which was imposed on the customers instead. (1) an individual called to inquire about duplicated billing – the customer support apparently accidentally changed her promotional plan – they were not able to change it back to the promotional rate leaving the customer paying 50% more. (2) an individual called to activate roaming – roaming was not activated by the customer support – the individual was left with a $1700 bill negotiated to $850 instead of a back-date to the roaming rate. (3) they are also negligent about refunds for phone returns.

Take note however that many customers only share their review or complain online when they are dissatisfied with the service and less so when they are satisfied with the customer service. With this said, we have combed through various customer service reviews site like TrustPilot, BBB, and Cellphones.ca, inclusive of various blog post. Reading between the lines, you can tell when a customer is holding a grudge against the company and looking simply to sabatoge their reputation versus when a customer has genuine concerns with customer service and sharing their experience for others to learn. Such is the case of Kent MacArthur on TrustPilot which reiterated the feedback on BBB with the three flaws summarized above. The first four negative reviews on TrustPilot appears to be less genuine issues.

Perks: Virgin Mobile provides quite a few perks and benefits from their customers, known as “members”. They really emphasize on member benefits. These benefits come in the form of exclusive discounts from various entertainment and retail stores. They also offer perks like Call Display and “MyPeeps” which gives you unlimited calling to 5 people of your choice. (Quite irrelevant if you already have unlimited Canada-wide calling however.)

– 2 for 1 tickets at Cineplex Theatres

– 25% off H&M

– 28 days trial at Goodlife Fitness (probably the only fitness centre that doesn’t continue charging you after you cancel haha)

– Up to 35% off Canada’s Wonderland (It’s in Toronto but if you ever do visit Toronto – check out Canada’s Wonderland. The PNE in Vancouver doesn’t quite compare to Canada’s Wonderland. It’s like Canadian’s smaller version of Universal Studios Park.)

A full list of perks can be found here:

https://www.virginmobile.ca/en/members-lounge/index.html

Report Card/Transcript:

Network Performance (30%) = 8/10

  • Virgin Mobile Canada was bought by Bell in July 1, 2009. Previously only using Bell’s CDMA network, it now uses Bell’s LTE, HSPA+, and CDMA networks. You get the same coverage as Bell customers.
  • Virgin Mobile Canada customers will also use Telus’ network in Western Canada. (which includes where we are in beautiful Vancouver, BC!)
  • Some customers have noted that Telus network works more reliably than Virgin Mobile in Western Canada. It is not uncommon practice for cellular service providers to prioritize certain customers during congestion. However, it is unclear of Virgin Mobile members are actually receiving a lesser priority than customers on the legacy brand.

Customer Service & Convenience (30%) = 7/10

  • Not as good as Fido but not as bad as Koodo where discount cellphone plans are considered.
  • Billing seems to be an issue customers experience with a disconnect between add-on benefits and charges. Special promotional plans seem to often “accidentally” be removed by customer service reps that cannot be undone leaving you to pay more.
  • Limited help can be provided by customer service reps and reaching management level is difficult process of transferring several calls. Management level customer service also appears unwilling to help and stuck-up when reached base on reviews.

Price (20%) = 7/10

  • Prices are Virgin Mobile are almost identical to Fido’s plans. The main value difference is the “Member benefits” provided by Virgin Mobile in their “Members’ lounge” which are discounts at retail stores.
  • Discount cellphone plans considered however, Fido’s perks with free Spotify and 5 hour of data makes their plans slightly cheaper!
  • Virgin Mobile provides more flexibility however with their plans. Allowing you to choose 500 Canada-Wide minutes instead of Unlimited for a $10 discount

Phones (10%) = 8/10

  • Virgin Mobile Canada provides fewer selection of phones (or new phones available later) than Rogers or Bell. For example, the Google Pixel 2 XL is not available on Virgin Mobile neither is the LG V30. Both phones are available on Bell and Fido for that matter. Bell has 43 smartphone devices to choose from whereas Virgin Mobile has 36, many of which are older devices. Further, the iPhone X is not yet available on Virgin Mobile but had already been pre-sold on Rogers’ much earlier.
  • Most phones are compatible with Virgin Mobile network now that Virgin Mobile Canada uses Bell’s LTE, HSPA+, and CDMA network. This means you can bring your own phone.

Perks (10%) = 9/10

  • Virgin Mobile has some cool perks in the form of discounts at various retailers for clothing, food, and lifestyle brands.
  • However, this doesn’t quite make up for free Spotify and free data at Fido in our opinion as not everyone may necessarily shop at these retail brands. Good perks for “members” nonetheless.

 

5) Freedom Mobile (Shaw & formally Wind Mobile): The prices are the cheapest you’ll find as far as a reasonable network coverage is a factor. There is still a lot more work for them to catch up in terms of coverage and receptivity. Especially in UBC, many have indicated Wind Mobile had horrendous coverage. If you’re a student, you don’t want spotty connections where you will be most often….studying in the libraries on a rainy day in Vancouver.  Prices are good however and they will likely improve service quality over time.

Despite the exceptionally low pricing of phone plans with Freedom Mobile, the network coverage and reliability may cost you more in opportunity costs than the savings itself. There are also additional surcharges for using your phone in an “Away Zone” within Canada unless you are on their Canada-wide plan.

If you consider the value of your time, your experience and convenience, along with the worry-free surcharges – it may be well cheaper to pay a little extra for a phone plan with one of the Big 3 (notably, Rogers’ base on various online reviews has some of the cheapest plans and best customer service in the industry which is why we’ve listed Rogers’ and Fido respectively on the top of this list. Telus does have a faster network but the difference with customer service – your time – is probably more important than a slight improvement in network speed!)

Plan:

Low Data Usage – 250 MB Data & Unlimited Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Canada-US Texting @ $30/Month (No Tab)

High Data Usage – 2 GB Data & Unlimited Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Canada-US Texting @ $40/Month (No Tab)

++ A current promotion from Freedom Mobile offers 10 GB data for $50 which charges $0.05/minute for calls to Canada and US but unlimited texting.

++ Public Mobile which is owned by Telus also offers 2 GB Data & Unlimited Canada-Wide Calling & Unlimited Canada-US Texting for $40/Month on a temporary promotion. This will probably offer you better network coverage for the same price.

Coverage: Freedom Mobile provides network coverage for the most of Greater Vancouver Area and Greater Toronto Area (their two main focuses it appears for network improvements.) Outside of their coverage areas are known as “Away Zones” which will incur additional surcharge for usage. If you expect to be traveling around Canada often outside of their network coverage zones, it would likely be better for you to simply choose Rogers, Telus, or Bell Canada-wide plan and avoid the additional surcharges. The surcharges for “Away Zones” are $0.15/minute for calls and $0.05/mb for data.

It should be noted the network coverage map bellow highlights the areas where you will be within Freedom Mobile’s Home Network. It does not provide you guaranteed reliability in their network as many customers have found out. “recently switched to Freedom. It’s on and off service of basic phone at home or office or open pubic spaces WI-FI/Data on my iphone 7 plus is not working Honestly don’t know why i trusted Freedom.” – Andres

https://www.freedommobile.ca/network-and-coverage/coverage

Reviews as recent as October 19, 2017 found in various blog comment sections consistently paint a picture that Wind as drastically reduced performance and network reliability since re-branding. Customers have noted inconsistent connectivity and dropped calls even on the LTE network. It would be expected to get worse only with even more customers on the network from their widely promoted “Big Gig” event. It seems to be open season on Freedom Mobile’s reputation from their customers (with good reason) wherever you read about their services base on real customer experiences.

Service: Service at Freedom Mobile is actually pretty good in my experience. The kiosk personnel at Freedom Mobile kiosks are generally friendly and willing to help. It draws on Shaw’s expertise and hence probably better than most budget phone providers. The major drawback to Freedom Mobile is that it is still catching up to the network performance of the Big 3. They are still not as reliable in terms of their network performance as these legacy carriers. Price and service wise however Freedom Mobile or Shaw can be a good option.

However, with this said, the customer feedback on BBB paints a different picture where many customers struggle with (1) network coverage – supposedly Freedom Mobile have oversold their network capabilities hence customers are competing for network usage even with their “unlimited” or high data plans. Seeing as the new “Big Gig” promotion that sells 10 GB of data for $50, and the expected ensuing new registrations of customers, I am inclined to believe these experiences shared on BBB. (2) Away Zones surcharge and complicated billing issues – seeing as they are a budget carrier, it makes sense to nickle and dime their customers as how most budget services are operated – inclusive of budget airlines. Generally choosing “budget” or cheap is more headache than going for a brand known for good customer service. Customers also reported unjust billing after cancellation and inconsistent policies with tabs/ billing discount for no tabs. (3) rude and unhelpful customer service – seeing as the stores are corporate and presumably performance base, it would make sense for the sale personnel to focus on the store’s financial performance.

These complaints are also fairly recent since Wind re-branded as Freedom Mobile so worth the consideration. For these reasons, we’ve listed Freedom Mobile as the last recommendation on our list of best student phone plans for students in Vancouver, BC. It’s cheap but it’s probably not worth your time or frustration or paying for services you cannot use consistently across the Greater Vancouver Area.

Perks: There are no perks provided by Freedom Mobile but they regularly run ongoing promotions to attract new customers.

Report Card/Transcript

Network Performance (30%) = 6/10

  • Many customers report very slow data and being dropped from calls or completely being directed towards the mailbox on Freedom Mobile.
  • Freedom Mobile is working on improving their network.
  • Coverage is limited to the Greater Vancouver Area and Greater Toronto Area. Outside of your “Home” network will incur roaming charges in “Away Zones”

Customer Service & Convenience (30%) = 6/10

  • Customer support at Freedom Mobile is a little lacking base on customer feedback. Perhaps growing pains but many customers report negative customer support experiences.
  • Freedom Mobile has limited number of stores in Vancouver and Toronto. To register for a plan, you have to do in-store with no options to order online.
  • Freedom Mobile does not provide online chat support. Your only option for customer service is visiting their stores (several of which are not corporate stores but franchises) or calling their customer service line – and waiting for a long time to reach a customer rep.

Price (20%) = 9/10

  • Without reservations, Freedom Mobile has probably the most competitively priced cellphone plans in Canada. However, you may end up paying for services you don’t use if you cannot connect to their network anyways.
  • They offer incredibly cheap data plans that are a fraction of what the Big 3 charge. Still, reliability and customer service is critically important so not to waste your time and the opportunity cost of dropped calls or missing important calls because of network connectivity. (Or the frustration of not being able to access data when you need it.) Their network is improving however and hopefully it will be worth while once their network is better.

Phones (10%) = 5/10

  • Freedom Mobile provides very limited selection of phones and currently does not offer any Apple products.

Perks (10%) = 7/10

  • There are no perks offered by Freedom Mobile but they do regularly run promotions for new customers.
  • Perks include the ability to add 3 GB of data for $30 if you run over your data saving you data overage costs.

 

The Rest of Student Phone Plans in Canada: There aren’t many options for student phone plans in Vancouver or Canada relative to other places like Europe. While we have listed our top 5 recommendations for the best student plan plans in Canada, here are the other options available to you as a student. It may be worth while knowing all the available options regardless allowing you to make an informed decision yourself!

Public Mobile (Telus) – Public Mobile is a discount cellphone plan provider that is a very viable alternative if you need no-frills cellphone service at an affordable price and reliable network coverage. It’s effectively exactly the same network as Telus except their Extended Coverage areas. The plans are very competitive at $40 for 2 GB data and unlimited Canada-wide calling. Customer service is acceptable with few frustrations; most of the support questions will be answered by other customers on their support forum however; perhaps one way they save money. You won’t likely find billing frustrations that customers have reported on Virgin Mobile Canada. Phone selection is limited.

ChatR (Rogers) – ChatR is Rogers’ budget phone provider. Even more budget than Fido. It does offer very limited support but a reliable network and good prices. There aren’t any underhanded techniques (like continuing to bill you after you’ve cancelled) to make up for the cheaper phone plans but it doesn’t have as extensive support or customer care as Rogers brand.

Videotron – An alternative available to you as well is to register for a phone plan in another province, such as Quebec, with Canada-wide usage (it will be on their partner network) and utilize your phone in BC. It’s not much cheaper but coverage may be better than Freedom Mobile for similar prices. For example, Videotron provides 8 GB plans for $65.95/month which is comparable to prices you get for Freedom Mobile (Public Mobile’s 5 GB plan with Canada-wide calling and Global texting for $67. So you get 3 GB of free data with this plan in Quebec.)

http://www.videotron.com/residential/mobile/mobile-plans

PC Mobile – Another excellent option if you’re looking for cheap phone plans. The post-paid services are owned and operated by Telus whereas the pre-paid services are owned and operated by Bell. President Choice still owns the trademark and kiosks. As you know by now, any of the Big 3 networks will provide generally reliable coverage across most of Canada. $40/Month will get you 500 MB data, 500 minutes calling, and unlimited nation-wide texting on the Telus network while $60/month will get you 1 GB data and unlimited Text and Talk. It’s cheaper than Virgin Mobile, Koodo, or Fido but expect a no-frills service.

SpeakOut 711 – Speakout is the pre-paid service by 711 that allows you to buy top-up vouchers for use on phone calls or data at $0.10/mb. You have to bring or buy your own phone (limited selection of phones available.) They offer a 2 GB plan with unlimited talk and text for $75. Very basic service for a no-frills, absolute basic service. Speakout uses Rogers’ network.

Cityfone (Rogers) – Acquired by Rogers’ in 2010. Cityfone is another discount cellphone plan provider in Canada. They offer rates similar to what you would find with Fido. $40 will get you 500 MB data, 200 minutes Canada-wide calling and unlimited text. $60 will get you 1 GB data, 400 minutes Canada-wide calling, and unlimited text. Voicemail, call waiting, conference calling, and call display is already included. As it is a brand that is less advertised by Rogers’, having fewer subscribers, you may not find as extensive customer support or infrastructure as with Fido. You can expect as good a network coverage as Fido however as Cityfone also operates LTE on Rogers’ network. 1 GB of data is $55 on Fido. It’s more suited and promoted towards temporary visitors to Canada such as tourists in Vancouver. So if your friends are visiting Vancouver and you want to hook them up with a local phone number, this is probably an option. Since Canada has one of the highest phone plans costs it may be cheaper for them to keep their current phone though especially if they are visiting from Europe or Asia.

http://www.cityfone.net/rate-plans/smartphone-and-blackberry-plans/

SaskTel – If you’re willing to live in Saskatchewan for the summer, then sign up for their phone plans there which are ridiculously cheap. Their Canada-wide plans can be used anywhere in Canada for phone calls, data, and text base on the FAQ. $110 gets you 20 GB data, unlimited Canada-wide calling, and unlimited Canada-wide texting! $90 if you want a little less data (15 GB). Their 1 GB plans are the same prices as Fido however.

https://www.sasktel.com/wps/wcm/connect/content/home/wireless/coverage-and-travel/travelling-with-your-phone-or-device

 

Thanks once again for reading our Vancouver guide to student phone plans in Canada.

 

More Tips: Here are more tips for saving money with your student phone plan.

– If you intend on getting a large data plan with Rogers, you may as well sign a 2 year contract for a free phone. The prices with or without a Tab are equal for 10 GB, 20 GB, 40 GB, and 80 GB share everything plan with Rogers.

– Fido is often the same price as Rogers (occasionally cheaper but if you use Data frequently, you’ll get more bang for your buck with Rogers) but you get more perks with Rogers. (The platform and customer service is also better with Rogers than Fido understandably as the main brand.)

– The general rule…the more data you get the better your plan value. It would be worth while to sign up for a Share-Everything plan with a friend and split the bill if you want data and want to save money. A 10 GB share everything plan with Rogers works out to about $135/month + $35 (another line) making it $170 split over two people is $85 per person for 5GB of data and unlimited local calling. Doing that with the 40 GB plan and 8 people works out to just $70/person (albeit a little unrealistic for such micro savings to have 8 people on your plan unless they are close friends or family.)

– Most cellphone service providers such as Rogers, Telus, and Bell often run promotions during September period; great deals on student phone plans (and phone plans in general). The promotions also often run in December especially deals on phones.

– Telus seems to have higher prices for phones on contract so if you need a new phone, your best bet is probably Fido or Rogers.

– Freedom Mobile by far has the best prices on phone plans (LTE Network) however reception and coverage is still sub-par compared to the Rogers or Telus.

– Authorized resellers may provide different promotions than the brands directly on both phone plans and phones.

– Different areas of Canada may have cheaper cellphone plan pricing. If you’re creative and willing to hop through some hoops you can save a lot of money on your student cellphone plan. For example, if you registered your phone plan in Saskatchewan (with a Saskatchewan phone number) your plan for 10 GB of data, unlimited local calling and text is only $60 CAD! (On both Bell and Rogers) Comparatively, I’m paying $145/month for the same 10 GB Share Everything plan with Rogers. This is probably due to higher competition provincially in Saskatchewan from Sasktel.

– When it comes to modern day essentials like cell phone service, it’s in your best interest to shell out a little (spend a little less on alcohol maybe) and get better service/reliability.

 

Personal Note:

Spending in excess of 20 hours to compose this article, I can say confidently that I plan on sticking with Rogers’ base on my experience thus far and the horror stories I’ve read about other network carrier customer support!

 

Thanks for reading this lengthy article on the best student phone plans in Vancouver! We hope it helps. – VancityAsks

VancityAsks Welcome guide to UBC

Published by:

Welcome to UBC,

This guide is intended to help welcome new students to UBC from out of town. We hope to cover (1) Food on campus (2) Cool things to do (3) Interesting knowledge about UBC. Basically what makes this such an awesome campus to spend four years of your life; a bit bias, but we’d say the best in Canada.

The writing will be written as a list format towards UBC new (and much beloved) president Santa J. Ono since it’s not every day you have the opportunity to welcome a school dean to his own campus. 😉 I’m sure in a few months, he’ll know all the symphony orchestra events, construction detours, and concerns.

Aerial view of Vancouver, UBC and Strait of Georgia

Aerial view of Vancouver, UBC and Strait of Georgia

Without further ado, here’s a few need to know about UBC:

Food at UBC:

Where do you find good food on campus? Where are the best food deals? This is by no means an extensive list of eateries at UBC but a highlight of a few notable mentions. UBC is almost a city of itself, there’s so many food choices around. 😀

UBC Food Services – UBC Food Services is a common sight on campus. They run cafes in about every faculty during the normal school year.

Pre-loading your UBC card (which also serves as an after-hours access card for your faculty building among other things) provides a 5% discount on food purchases.

Coffee – UBC Food Services rely on a variety of coffee bean suppliers; all are actually consistently good. They  even serve coffee made from freshly roasted beans by Milano Coffee Roasters in Vancouver which is featured as our #2 pick for the best coffee in Vancouver. Milano Coffee is also participating in our free Vancouver walking tours. (which are now operating year-around so sign up for a free tour in Vancouver when you come in September!)

Place Vanier UBC Location

Place Vanier Highlighted in red on the map.

Totem Park UBC location

Totem Park Highlighted in red on the map.

Vanier Dining Room– It’s a first year residence cafeteria attached on the second floor of Place Vanier’s common block. This UBC food services venue has delicious wraps (better than Totem Park – the Vanier Dining Room has a salmon option which Totem dining room doesn’t carry. Got to have your Omega-3 during exams and blueberries!), burgers station, and the Asian feature station.

(While the Vanier Dining Room is operated by UBC Food Services just like Totem Park, it appears the two cafeteria are still distinctly different varying in service and food quality).

Totem Dining Room – The Totem Dining Room is another first year residence cafeteria; much like Vanier is on the 2nd floor of the residence common block. The Totem Dining Room features more ethic food traditionally if I’m not mistaken. (I remember once in first year, being so excited to see “laska” unfortunately it was nothing like the “laska” in Singapore. Still a grateful experience.) The dining hall has a very nice outdoor patio with glimpse of the sea. Gorgeous dining spot during the September sunset with a crisp, cool breeze before the rain begins in November. #OnlyatUBC  (Hope you’re ready for weeks of rain President Santa – nothing like the weather in Cinnaniti. Unfortunately you’re no longer in the #HottestCollegeinAmerica…noticing your interest in liberal arts on Twitter maybe you’d like to correct this homonym.)

 

Totem Park also has a late-night burger eatery, part of the Magda’s convenience store at Totem Park. Vanier also has it’s own late-night Hubburd’s convenience store without an attached grill.  Generally, it’s better to order pizza from Domino’s if you’re eating late on campus so Vanier isn’t losing out with late-night food options. Domino’s on Dunbar closes at 3 AM daily and you can use your UBC card to pay (Flex Dollars). Students also frequently visit the 24 hours Macdonalds at University Village.

The Totem Dining Room has better views but the Vanier Dining Room seem to have better atmosphere. (It’s a cozy place to grab a coffee and study in a corner. They have cafe-like seating booths.)

Both Vanier and Totem dining rooms feature residences’ prices and general prices (for other students without a meal plan); the food is typically still overpriced for the portion and quality. There’s also an obsession with having to dine with others; residence floors typically go to dinner together. It may feel awkward eating by yourself but sometimes it’s nice just to eat outside alone, think how far behind you are with work and enjoy the scenery.

Both are still wonderful first-year residences and a great experience for first-year students. The culture is great; people are supportive and caring especially your floor mates. There are many first-year activities organized by RAs (Resident Advisers – they’re paid too little for the things that they have to go through.)  Each Common Block also has a pool or billiard table for socializing and a field for outdoor sports. Place Vanier is closer to the beaches, Math faculty, Commerce faculty, Arts faculty, Nitobe Gardens, IKB Library, Koerner, and the bus loop while Totem Park is closer to the Botanical Gardens, Thunderbird Stadium, Computer Science faculty, Engineering Faculty, Earth Sciences building, Geography faculty, and Science faculty.

 

Tip – First year students requiring a residence meal plan may wish to choose the lowest meal plan.

(1) As with life, generally the more you have the more you tend spend frivolously and you definitely don’t need to help your freshman 15. (On a side note, consider putting 20% of your income to savings before budgeting your finances when you can.)

(2) Another factor, in your first three months at residence you’ll probably find the cafeteria pretty interesting but eventually it gets boring and you’d rather eat elsewhere on campus (which will use your “flex dollars”) or near campus. There are many diverse cuisines in Vancouver and so many delicious eateries around. Vancouver is especially popular for its fresh seafood; there are also over 600 sushi restaurants in Vancouver, here’s where you can find the best sushi in Vancouver. Popularly Tojo’s Sushi was appointed Japan Food Ambassador also supposedly accredited to first create the California roll. In summary, you will likely require more flex dollars than meal plan dollars. It’s best to have your spending in cash rather than locked to a card plan.

(3) The higher your meal plan the more you pay in overhead fees.

Residence life is really part of your UBC experience, it’s something that you can only get at UBC. SFU is an excellent school with good professors but it’s a commuter school primarily with less campus involvement (keeners).

 

Tim Hortons: There are two Tim Hortons franchise ran by UBC Food Services on campus. There’s always a line up during the regular school year. You’re better off getting a coffee from one of the many UBC Food Services café if you’re in a rush. You can use your UBC Card at these two Tim Hortons.

  • The Tim Hortons by Sauder School of Business only serves drinks and pastries.
  • The Tim Hortons by the Forestry building is a full service Tim Hortons
Tim Hortons Donuts displayed UBC

Welcome to Canada! Picture from Flickr (rfzappala)

 

UBC Nest up top

What’s at the top of this new student union building? Picture from Wiki Commons

AMS Nest: UBC has a brand-new student union building that’s stunning.

The Delly – The Delly is a familiar name to many UBC students. It’s a convenient option for a quick bite with their pre-made sandwiches or custom made-to-order sandwiches. They also have a variety of delicious deserts and a selection of Indian curries. Prices are very reasonable around $7 per meal (Italian Sub, Coffee, Cookie) and food quality is acceptable. They used to have a popular 50% off on Fridays in the old sub; this offer is no longer available in the Nest.

Pie R 2 – Carried over from the old sub, now with a  new stylish look in the Nest. It’s a frequented pizza store ran by the AMS. Pizzas are $2.94; it appears to have changed from the old recipe.

Pie R Square at UBC Nest

New Pie R Square. Picture from Wiki Commons

Upper Case & Lower Case – Seems like the re-branding of the infamous Blue Chip cookies. Did you know, UBC tours use to give visitors a free blue chip cookie.

(Blue Chip cookies are no longer sold by weight – It’s $2.50 per cookie now. The bagel store didn’t make it over to the new student union building either. Delicious fresh, daily bagels with a variety of cream cheese or smoke salmon. They had 50% off day old bagels too which is actually fresher than the supermarket still.)

Flip Side – Your typical burger store (very inefficiently ran by the AMS – three cooks! In the end it still seems just one person is doing the order taking and cooking.). Your standard burgers and fries. They have daily specials; try their poutine. About poutine, here are the best poutine in Vancouver. Oakwood Canadian Bistro on the list is only 20 minutes by bus (#4 or #84) from UBC.

Grand Noodle Emporium – The Asian take out (“The Moon”) in the old student union building which got a make over. They now serve Asian take-out and Ramen noodle.  Dine-in eating space available.

Grocery Store – There’s a small Grocery Store in the SUB. They sell pre-packet raw meats in simple single-serve portions.

There used to be a fancy restaurant at the Nest call “Perch” which wasn’t doing well and has since closed.

New NEST student union building UBC

Interior of the Nest. Picture from Wiki Commons.

 

University Village: A multi-level complex very close to the bus loop with a variety of retail stores, services, and apartments.

Pearl Fever – The legendary bubble tea shop at UBC campus. This is where you get the best bubble tea on campus. There’s

Bubble Waffle Cafe – It’s a nice and cozy Asian cafe that serves bubble tea, bubble waffles, Teppanyaki rice, and a variety of hot dishes.

Pita Pit – Healthy food on the go located towards Gold Gym at University Village. You can use your UBC card here (flex dollars).

Fresh Slice – Average pizza franchise. Tuesdays special $1.25/slice if I’m not wrong. (Though Pie R 2 is better – support your student run businesses. It provides jobs for students and goes back to your AMS fund.).

Pizza Garden – Newer pizza store at University Village. Stone oven pizza.

Only U Café – A cafe serving breakfast and lunch. Quite a favourite for many UBC students but I didn’t quite understand the hype.

Three more sushi stores. Suga Sushi is typically lower quality sushi but reasonably good Korean BBQ. Mio Sushi  which is opposite Starbucks is Ok; they also do teriyaki on the grill. One More Sushi for dine-in sushi restaurant with passable quality.

Furthermore, you’ll find A&W, Booster Juice, Vera’s Burger, and a Red Burrito (it always seems empty). Personal favourite is the A&W between CIBC and the pharmacy where “our beef is raised without any added hormones or steroids.”

There’s too much to mention but on your way to University Village you cross by the dentistry buildings that has Shoppers Drug Mart (for your hygiene, pharmacy, and a small food grocery selection) along with Mahoney’s and Sons – a frequent spot for student and faculty celebrations. As far as grocery store goes there’s also a Granville Island Produce at University Village which also sells delicious chocolate muffins.

University Village narrow between BMO and Subways

University Village between BMO and Subways. Picture from Wiki Commons.

 

University Village Food Court: A basement level food court with the entrance besides Bubble Waffle Cafe at University Village.

My Home Cuisine & Black Pearl – As far as Chinese food is concerned, My Home Cuisine is better than Black Pearl. Both offer great value for Chinese take-out. It’s about $6 for two items and rice (regular price). A frequent special offer is $3.99 for two items and rice.

In contrast, a desert at UBC residence café would already probably cost you around $3.99. It does get boring quickly though because the menu doesn’t seem to change but the food quality is acceptable. It’s fast convenience food. BBQ Roast Pork, Ginger chicken, spicy fish (really spicy), and Sweet and sour pork are some nice items. It’s even cheaper than Richmond’s Yaohan food court.

Osaka Sushi – Big portions for sushi but not the best quality. Many students share they enjoy the Bento boxes here.

Vietna Vietnamese CuisineAccording to Reddit, it’s good pho. (The other sections of Reddit are like a whole other world of the internet. People are so cynical.)

Among other things are two donair shop, Mongolian grill, and Want Want Hot & Spicy.

Overall, th University Village food court provides an ethic variety of convenience food for very good prices.

 

Wesbrook Village Fountains UBC

Very nice village-like village on South West of UBC. Picture from Wiki Commons.

Wesbrook Village: UBC is truly a city of itself in some sense. WesBrook village is a rapidly growing community with plenty to see, eat, and do.

There’s a Save on Foods (grocery store) here, Menchies frozen yogurt, Jugo Juice, Bier Craft for pub food and beer, To-go Sushi (one of the better quality sushi on campus), newly opened Roger’s Chocolates (their Gastown location is also in our Vancouver Walking Tours), Hung’s Beef noodle, and an elderly home. The BC liquor store is here as well (almost forgot to mention this).

C20/C18 and 41 bus to transit there if you’re lazy to walk.

You can have pretty much find what you need without going off campus. (There’s also a salon at the Nest, beauty parlor, musical shop, and dentistry office at Wesbrook Village). Wesbrook village has the same “vibe” as Kitsilano neighborhood. (New and fresh, yet cozy)

 

Good Coffee: Coffee is part of Vancouver’s identity. UBC is fortunate that we have good coffee everywhere!

Convenience Store by Bookstore – This convenience store is a recent edition among the new book store; it’s also attached to a Starbucks. The “RocketFuel” Coffee at this bookstore is good, the food is typically overpriced packaged meals (per usual food on campus for some reason.) It’s a good place to grab a coffee on your way to class. They had a “loyalty program” on their opening where every 11th cup of coffee is free. That means a free coffee every week if you drink as much coffee as a typical university student. 😉

The Boulevard – They are located besides Scotiabank at the Dentistry buildings and roast their own beans on site.

Bean Around the World – This is a popular coffee chain which supposedly serves excellent coffee. The coffee shop is located near the Forestry faculty building by the Old Barn (Community centre).

The Great Dame – This café is near the theology buildings opposite St.Andrews Residence. Coffee here is on the milder and sour side. (My opinion but real coffee should be bitter and strong.) It seems like popular cafe though.

Here’s all you need to know about coffee on campus: http://ubyssey.ca/blog/bean-around-campus-best-coffee-ubc137/

 

Favourite Food Spots: Not an expert with UBC food but for what it’s worth, here’s my personal favourite spots for food on campus the four years at UBC. 😀

  • A&W: University Village.
  • PitaPit: University Village.
  • Tim Hortons:  Forestry Building (full food menu)
  • Blue Chip Cookie (Now called UpperCase): The Nest

When planning to eat out, I typically look for quick convenience food with some nutritional value. The real value of eating out for me is saving valuable time.

The University Village food court, along with  A&W, and Pita Pit provides easy, reasonable priced, and relatively healthy food that you can grab-and-go quickly if you’re living on campus. Among the many uprising developments at the Bus Loop area…there are rumors a Chipotle store will be opening in 2016 (from UBC Confessions page).

 

Food Deals: Here’s a re-cap of some shocking food deals that can be found on campus because who doesn’t like a good deal.

  • $3.33 Triple O’s Tuesday at Triple O’s (next to Sauder School of Business)
  • $3.99 two items and rice at My Home Cuisine (University Village food court)
  • Daily specials at Flip Side (the Nest basement)
  • $2.95 for medium coffee & cookie at the Delly (the Nest basement)

Cool Things to do at UBC:

What’s there to do between your spare time? Not only is UBC the 2nd best university in Vancouver, they probably have the best campus in Canada. What other campus in Canada has one of the most authentic Japanese garden in North America, visited by the (now) emperor of Japan, its own golf course, and a biodiversity museum on campus with a full Blue Whale Skeleton display (it’s truly YUGE ;)), and three distinct beaches on campus.

Beaches – UBC’s three beaches is a worthy mention. It’s also very near to Jericho beach (anyone a fan of sailing? There’s a sail club here) and Spanish Banks beach. (Great place to catch outdoor volleyball during summer). Between Jericho (farther from UBC) and Spanish Banks (closer to UBC, walk-able from Tower beach) is Locarno Beach (good for outdoor BBQ). Side note, the Point Grey and Kits neighborhood is also very quaint with unique shops for a nice walk reasonably close to the water.

Wreck Beach: It’s a nude beach that’s fairly known in Vancouver. It has a great sunset view westward. During summer times, you’ll notice a lot of non-UBC individuals and some questionable characters. (Unfortunately, you meet at the bus loop.). Don’t go sightseeing there (you may run into your professor. Eek.)

Entrance is behind Place Vanier residence with a long stairs down. (another benefit to Place Vanier, you’re no more than 5 minutes from the beach and Nitobe Gardens. It’s right next door.)

Tower Beach: An awe-inspiring, long hike down to a pebble filled beach with a historical search light tower (hence the name). Saw a few jade stones on Tower Beach, I think. You can enjoy the beautiful sunsets, tranquil waters, and the only beach on UEL where you can view the open sea (not really open with Victoria), North Shore Mountains, and parts of Vancouver downtown together. (Excellent for panorama shots.) It is a good escape to nature.

Entrance is on East Mall, walk pass the Law building on East mall towards the water and you’ll see a small entrance.

Acadia Beach – Towards Spanish Banks is Acadia Beach. This is where you’ll find sandier beaches and a good swimming spot. It’s also near towards the Pacific Spirit Park trails but there’s reportedly no trails officially made for this beach.

Vancouver Beach Sunset UBC

Beach in Vancouver during Sunset. Imagine enjoying this EVERYday.

 

Nitobe Garden – Nitobe Gardens has quite a lot of accreditation. Among many, it’s one of the most authentic Japanese Garden. It’s near the Asian cultural centre and it’s a beautiful garden with free access for students and faculty.

Nitobe Memorial Garden UBC

Nitobe Memorial Garden at UBC. Picture from Wiki Commons.

 

Golf Course  – There’s a full 18 hole golf course on the University Endowment Lands (UEL) added with a driving range for your practice. Join the UBC Golf Club and get discounts on green fees. My friend from first-year residence did it, and they had some great deals for golfers with a supportive community.

 

Pacific Spirit Park – Besides a golf course and great views, another thing that makes the UBC campus so awesome is a 874 hectares park with 73km of hiking trails. The park runs from south to north with the golf course and University Boulevard in the middle. It’s a favourite for joggers and outdoor enthusiasts.

Pacific Spirit Park UBC

Park sign. Pacific Spirit Park in Vancouver, BC.  UEL ecological reserve. Picture from Wiki Commons.

 

Museums – UBC is home to the popular Museum of Anthropology and Beaty Biodiversity Museum. Both have provide free access for students so grab a friend and go for a gander.

Beaty Biodiversity Museum Blue Whale Skeleton Display

Beaty Biodiversity Museum. Blue Whale Skeleton display. Picture from Wiki Commons.

 

UBC Rose Garden

UBC Rose Garden (Edited Picture)

Rose Garden – As it’s name implies. This is a rose garden. The flowers only bloom in summer primarily but it’s still a nice spot to watch the sea, mountains, and occasional ferries going by. Good spot to finish readings maybe. Find it as you walk by the Canada Flag roundabout.

 

Chan Centre – The Chan centre is where you’ll frequently find performing arts events. The concert hall is inspired by a Cello. You’ll find frequent performance by UBC choir and UBC Symphony Orchestra. Do note, your cellphone may not work there; according to our orientation guide, the concert hall was built with copper to intentionally block out cellphone reception.)

 

More to mention:

  • Some may remember when UBC had bouncy bushes (natural trampoline) unfortunately it appears to have succumb to construction and progression; there’s still an old video on Youtube for keepsake.
  • If you’re up for a walk, there’s great views walking the entrance of Tower Beach towards Spanish Banks. (stunning views)
  • UBC also has a farm and a botanical garden. The UBC farm once again emphasizes the concept of sustainability and is the only working farm in city of Vancouver.

 

Adding further to the list students have free access to UBC’s aquatic centre drop-in swimming sessions. It’s also a frequent spot for nap sessions by commuter students. You’ll also find students studying atop in the warm but chlorine-smelling atmosphere to escape the cold, rainy weather. (Apparently studying at different locations aids your memory. There are also many excellent study spots at UBC. UBC also has many fantastic libraries including one which looks like an upside down book, Koerner Library. It’s a world class campus.)

UBC Koerner Library

UBC Koerner Library. Picture from Wiki Commons, photographer xicotencatl.

  • Koerner Library: You’ll find the basement floor has copious amount of study tables and remarkably quiet.
  • Irving K. Barber Library (IKB): The go-to library for most students. Heritage stacks are here, most books are here, and a few classes occur in the basement level. It’s quietest location if you need silence to concentrate but there are many break-out rooms you can book. Ike’s Cafe is attached to the library for your coffee runs.
  • Concordia Library: Where you will see overly dressed Sauder students. Generally very bright (location). The top floor has great views of the flag-pole while studying which is why I liked it.  Variety of group study areas and silent study area along with a few breakout rooms.
  • Forestry Building: This is where you should visit. Very impressive wood structure inside. Each floor has two study desk at the balcony. Generally quiet, private, and great place to enjoy natural lighting while you study.
  • Marine Drive Residence building: If you want to study and relax, go to the couches at the Marine Drive common block. Great views, nice couches, fireplace, and a good place to study. It can get noisy but it usually isn’t.
  • Ponderosa Study Rooms: The new residences have study rooms besides the Mercante Cafe (which has good thin-crust pizzas).
  • Beach: Catching up on text book readings? The wonderful thing about UBC is you’re just 10 minutes to the beach ON CAMPUS so go for a hike down to the beach to do your readings. (static noise of the waters can help you concentrate too).
  • There are many other study spots, it would require a list of itself. Many faculty have rooms you can book or use when it’s not being used especially the upper levels of Sauder School or business and Buchanan buildings as well as the Computer Science faculty. There are also empty rooms typically at Forestry after hours.

This segment will continue to be updated. There’s so much to do at UBC; such a unique campus combining the convenience of urban living surrounded, and steeped with history (it’s on native land and was used as a fortress in World War II). Even still, peppered with culture and attractions.

 

Interesting Knowledge about UBC:

 

More cool facts about UBC:

https://www.ubc.ca/about/facts.html

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Fun-Facts.pdf

 

Thanks for reading our UBC Welcome Guide:

Hope you enjoyed VancityAsks‘ guide to UBC.

The article draws on personal experience from four years at UBC (albeit the campus changes EVERY year) as well as consolidation of information from these sites:

http://www.food.ubc.ca/places-to-eat/

http://ubyssey.ca/blog/food-truck-map/

http://learningcommons.ubc.ca/power-your-brain-cheap-food-ubc-top-10/

http://www.ubcsororities.com/2015/10/15/12-budget-friendly-eats-around-and-just-off-ubc/

http://you.ubc.ca/ubc_stories/ubc-fun-facts/

UBC Aerial View

UBC Aerial View. Picture from Wiki Commons.

 

UBC’s New President!

A bit more about Santa J. Ono as written by the Straight:

“In 2015, Ono turned down a bonus for the third consecutive year, preferring to give $190,000 of the $200,000 to fund scholarships, staff awards, housing for students, arts, respite care, and other worthy causes. The final $10,000 was handed over to the family of a fallen police officer. His base salary was $520,000 and he refused the board of trustees’ offer to give him a raise.”

This man emphasizes the concept of servant-leadership. A concept which was echoed as well by Stephen Toope which initiated the push for developing more student residences. Finding unique ways to fund UBC growth while helping students with much needed on-campus residence. In my humble opinion, smart move to accept more international students – higher tuition fees for them and more diversified community (higher rankings as the most international university in Canada doesn’t hurt either.)

Santa J. Ono is also taking a 25% “pay cut” to accept his new position at UBC (relative to his pay at UC) of which money seems a small concern for him after turning down various raise at UC.

This is what Ubessey has to say about Ono, “Ono really does seem to care — this isn’t just for show. “The reason I developed a special relationship with the students is that they knew I listened to them in both personal life and through social media,” he said on his affinity with students at the University of Cincinnati. “I miss them. I absolutely love them.””

With this said, lest this should be flattery, lets’ avoid building too high a chair for Santa J. Ono. “A loud and cheerful greeting early in the morning will be taken as a curse!”

None the less, we’re excited for UBC. [For information of significance, UBC contributes over 12 billion dollars to BC’s economy with over 560 million dollars in research funding for more than 8000 projects.” This simulates the economy in Vancouver, providing more jobs, training students to be more valuable – hopefully – members in society.

I remember in my Econ 350/370 class on Canadian public finance about two years ago; we saw the significant external benefits to higher education for society and for the individuals themselves. The dollar value of social benefits to higher education out weight the cost (especially with female students). This is maybe why government subsidizes higher education and why it increases the overall marginal social benefit for doing so. While Regan is famous for pushing that “Government is not the solution, it’s the problem…” government is especially useful when there are externalities in the market. Without the subsidies, the equilibrium point chosen by an individual’s private marginal benefit to private marginal cost would be well below the socially optimal level.

Without positive or negative externalities (which is rarely the case – our actions always affect others), a free market without regulation is more efficient for society – not necessary more fair. Though where externalities exist. subsidies and taxes are efficient to bring the market to a socially efficient point of equilibrium or where re-distribution for “fairness” is concerned; the measurement for an efficient point of subsides however is difficult (it’s like weighing how heavy a glass of water is with your eye).

There’s the economics student in me lol; correct me if I’m wrong, going by memory and not the scribbled class notes I’ve put away years ago. Something actually useful learnt in class 😉

 

TL;DR: We should be thankful that the government pays about 50% of student tuition for residents.  It’s worthwhile for government to subsidize tuition for students in hopes they’ll be more productive to society and pay more taxes to come. Still more can be done relative to the benefits of education.

5 good churches in Vancouver

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This article may not represent the opinion of VancityAsks.com but represents the opinion of the editor/writer:

There’s no such thing as a best church in Vancouver. When it comes to faith, it’s about family and it’s not a competition for the best or biggest church. While there is no such thing as the best church in Vancouver, there are many good churches in Vancouver and many choices available.

At VancityAsks.com we hope to help locals and tourists find the best of Vancouver. Since there isn’t such a thing as the best church in Vancouver, we’re going to share some things to consider for when looking for a local church along with five good churches for your consideration.

Perhaps, you’re new to the city and looking for a Vancouver church. Maybe you’re simply looking for a community to grow, we hope the following list can help you along. Enjoy reading.

If you’re non-religious, feel free to skip on to another article. If you’re looking however for a supportive community founded in Love, I hope you consider reading the list and stepping into one of these cathedrals (building, community centers, or theatre nowadays). It may be the missing piece you’re looking for to fill that emptiness or desire?

 

Note: The church is His body and I believe He cares about it. Shouldn’t you? It’s the longest living organization on earth that has planted schools, advocated for education, advanced science, and built/staffed hospitals. (Look at St. Paul’s if you need a local example) It cannot be under emphasized that if you’re a Christian, you should get connected and serving in a local church. I cannot think of a government or society group that has made as much an impact globally than the Church. I believe the local church is one of many ways that God uses to help humanity and add to society tangibly, an expression of His care and His love.

“And Jesus came and spoke to them, saying, “All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.” – Matthew 28:18

If you want to experience the full power of God then be connected to a local church; it’s the dispensation that it comes through imho. Much like how the feeding of 5000, the people set in groups (organization), and the disciples (church) distributed the food. The miracle was from the Lord, but the disciples were used and order was present. Order as you will find is very important for progress. Order such as the usage of gifts through the church.

 

How to find a good church in Vancouver?

As I mentioned, there is no such thing as the best church in Vancouver. There are many good options for community and fellowship. Here are some things I look for when trying to find a church in Vancouver. It’s by no means a definitive list but what I believe are important points.

Christ Centered church: Look for a church that emphasizes on the finish work of Jesus Christ and the second person of the God-head. You don’t have Christianity without Christ. It’s about God’s love towards humanity that He sent His Son; it should not be only about our frailties or God’s judgement.

Biblically based: A church should be grounded in the Bible. While I believe there’s an importance to relevance in society, it should be in context of the Word. Church goers did not go to church to hear what reader digest said about modern culture – they already do that in the washroom.

Triune God-head: It’s been said that how people live their lives are based upon (1) their view of God (2) their view of themselves. It’s been emphasized throughout the Bible the concept of the triune God-head. I believe it’s an important point that a Vancouver church acknowledges the triune God as it affects your view of God and hence how you live your life; it’s also a reflection of being Biblically based. (“Elohim” is a plural word with references in the Bible using “Let us” still further saying “the Lord is one!”)

New Covenant: In my humble opinion, it’s important that the church emphasizes on the New Covenant or grace. All books of the Bible are important for the full counsel is necessary and every word of God is profitable for teaching, rebuking, and training in righteousness. Let’s show the world love and grace because we have first been recipients of this love and grace from Him.

Community: Finally, community cannot be understated. We all have a longing to belong; maybe this branches to our desire to achieve, and to succeed. If Christianity is about a relationship with God then you would know your horizontal relationships matter as well.

Unfortunately by virtue that we’re humans and we make mistakes (sometimes wilfully), some people have been hurt by the church community itself. This should not mean that you put yourself at a distance from community always but maybe find another community.

 

Now that I’ve underlined what has been considered when creating the list of churches in Vancouver, here are some good churches for you to consider visiting.

 

Five Good Vancouver Churches:

Westside Church: A Christ-centered Mennonite Brethren church right in the heart of Vancouver pastored by pastor Norm Funk. This church has a history of going through books of the Bible for sermon series with relevance to modern living. It’s a great church that you can be sure is giving sound doctrine.

The community is friendly comprising of yuppies, young families, young professionals, and students. Westside also has a church in North Vancouver headed by pastor James Bonney. They run life groups throughout the year allowing for more tightly knitted fellowship in small groups.

Services throughout the year meet at 9 AM and 11 AM on Sundays though only one service per week during the summer at 10 AM on Sundays as well. The congregation is fairly large – may be the largest downtown Vancouver church with several thousand members. The Vancouver campus also features a cool café serving tea and pastries before and after service. It’s definitely one of my favourite churches in Vancouver.

Westside Church Vancouver - Good Vancouver churches

Westside Church at 777 Homer Street in Vancouver, BC. Picture taken from Google maps, street view.

Address: 777 Homer St, Vancouver, BC V6B 2W1

 

Broadway Pentecostal Church Vancouver: Broadway Church in Vancouver is a modern church under the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada and shepherded by lead pastor Darin Latham (who was a former police officer in Toronto area and enjoys apologetics).  Broadway Pentecostal plans their sermon series at the start of the year on different topics varying from money management to hung-ups; these effectively finding biblical answers to are life topics.

Broadway Pentecostal Church in Vancouver features a diversified international community comprising of many mature families (children in high school or universities) with elders and younger families. They don’t have a very active community group program at Broadway Pentecostal Church but feature other programs. Broadway Pentecostal church also runs various programs such as a day care and City Reach society (a separate non-profit association affiliated with Broadway Church) as well as contributing to the YVR airport Champlain program.

Since Broadway Pentecostal Church Vancouver is such an inter-generational church, they have elected to run three services with different styles of worship. The 9 AM service features the traditional worship service, the 11:15 AM service features a contemporary worship service and the 6 PM service features an emerging worship service (with loud music, and free food targeting young adults)

Broadway Pentecostal church - Good churches in Vancouver

Broadway Pentecostal church at 2700 E Broadway. Picture taken from Google maps, street view.

Address: 2700 E Broadway, Vancouver, BC V5M 1Y8

 

Willington Church Vancouver: Willington Church Vancouver is another Mennonite Brethren church just outside Vancouver in Burnaby by Metro-town area. It’s headed by pastor Mark Loewen and one of the largest church in the Vancouver area.

The community is once again very multicultural. The church also takes on various ministries for the betterment of their members and the city at large. The Willington Mennonite Brethern church has a strong emphasis on the gospel and prayer with open invitation for prayer on their website. Here’s their statement of faith:

I have not personally visited this church so don’t have much further information about it but I have had many friends who attend this church and enjoy the diversified community of people.

Willingdon church in Vancouver - Good churches in Vancouver

Willingdon Church at 4812 Willingdon Ave. Picture taken from Google maps, street view.

Address: 4812 Willingdon Ave, Burnaby, BC

 

Coastal Church Vancouver: Coastal Church is a non-denominational church in downtown Vancouver right in front of the Trump tower. The church’s lead pastor is Dave and Cheryl Coop. Coastal Church in Vancouver likes to ensure their sermons are relevant to modern living and the hub city of Vancouver (where people regularly transit in and out). Their self-professed mission at the church is to make the city of Vancouver a better place.

Coastal Church has a strong emphasis on community with life groups running throughout the year in cycles on different topic or sermon. Congregation is comprises a lot of students and working adults and couples in downtown Vancouver. The church also encourages entrepreneurship and positive thinking. They have a strong online presence and social media team which is unusual for a church.

Services run weekly on Saturdays at and Sundays at 9 AM, 11 AM and 12:30 PM for about 1.5 hours, an introduction followed by a brief 45 minutes sermon between worship. Coastal Church is built in a historical building on 1160 West Georgia Street where you can see drawings of the old architecture of the building pinned in the hallways.  They provide free coffee, apples, and snacks after service and also have a kiosk that serves ice cream, fresh squeeze orange juice at a nominal cost.

Coastal Church in Vancouver, BC

Coastal Church in Vancouver, BC. Picture courtesy of Google Maps, street view.

Address: 1160 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, BC V6E 3H7

 

TBD: This is kept in the faith that another church will come to Vancouver that will contribute to the local community J

 

More Churches in Vancouver:

Here are many other churches in Vancouver.

West Coast Christian Fellowship: WCCF was suggested on our Facebook post. They are a non-denominational church affiliated with Salt & Light Ministries (http://www.saltlight.org/international/). Their statement of faith can be found here. Services start at 11:30 AM on Sundays.

“We believe God has called us to be a Christ-centered, Word-based, Spirit-led Family.” – WCCF website

Address – 3198 E Georgia St, Vancouver, BC V5K 2L1

Website – http://wccf.ca/

 

Salvation Army Cariboo Hill Temple: Located in Burnaby, Salvation Army Cariboo Hill Temple was suggested as well on our Facebook post. I was not able to find mentions of their denomination but I would assume affiliation to the Salvation Army? Their statement of faith can be found here. Services run on Sundays at 10:30 AM and 6 PM.

They value, “People, Word of God, Growth, Spiritual Gifts, Relationships, Service, Prayer” – http://www.cariboohill.ca/our-values 

Address – 7195 Cariboo Rd, Burnaby, BC V3N 4A6

Website – http://www.cariboohill.ca/

 

Bethel International Church: Bethel International Church was suggested from someone on our Facebook page. Services appear to be at 10 AM on Sundays. Not affiliated to Bethel music.

“We desire to make a lasting difference in people’s lives in the city of Vancouver and beyond. Our vision is to be a community of transformation: where people disconnected from God experience fullness of life through knowing Jesus.” – Bethel International Church website

Address – 739 33 AVE E, Vancouver, BC

Website – http://bethelinvancouver.com/

 

Redemption Church: Formally Point Grey Community Church which was joint with another church to form Redemption Church. They are a Pentecostal church with affiliations to the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada. Services run on Sunday at 9 AM and 11:15 AM.

“To follow our Redeemer and King Jesus in bringing his love and salvation to every person we can. To be a church that loves others in a generous, gracious, and joyful. To make disciples who are obedient to Jesus in thought, word, and deed. To bring the transforming and renewing power of God into the city and the world.”  – http://www.redemptionchurch.ca/about/

Address – 3512 7 AVE W, Vancouver, BC

Website – http://www.redemptionchurch.ca/

 

Relate Church: Relate Church was suggested by several on our Facebook page as well. Otherwise known as Victory Christian Centre, this congregation was renamed to Relate Church in 2009. It appears that Relate Church is affiliated to Hillsong Churches (Pentecostal) and have adopted a similar vision with the “Church that I see”.  Services are on Saturdays at 5:10 Pm and Sundays at 9:40 AM along with 11:40 AM.

“We exist to build the church by developing flourishing relationships with God and people.” – Relate Church Website

Address – 6788 152 St, Surrey, BC V3S 3L4

Website – http://www.relatechurch.ca/

 

Trinity Central Church: This church was also recommended by someone on our Facebook page. It’s a new church in Vancouver seeking to impact this city with the message of the gospel. They are part of Newfrontiers family of churches. Trinity Central Church meets in the Vancity Theater on Sundays at 10:30 AM.

“We’re a community that’s all about loving God and loving people. Our vision is to reach and influence Vancouver by building a Christ centred church that changes mindsets and empowers people to lead and transform society in every sphere of life.” – Trinity Central Church website

Address – 1181 Seymour Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 2E8

Website – http://www.trinitycentral.org/

 

Take caution:

Think for yourself – I’ve heard it spoken before, “do not leave your brains at home when you come to church”. Remember to think for yourself. Church is not a place where you ignore logic or thought processes; God created your brain as much as he created you.

Do not let anyone else think for you; esteem the teacher but do not regard anyone more highly than you ought. Christianity is not a brainless religion; that’s a cult. Christianity is about relationship between a Holy God and humanity saved by grace and love. Many of the greatest philosophers and individuals in academia are Christians.

Adding or Taking – Be careful when people make deviations from the Word. There are minor and major disputes as in life there are disagreements of opinion and interpretations although the crux of the gospel and the God-head should not be disputed neither should the instructions in the Bible be contradicted.

I believe God has made us all with an intuitive desire for worship and community. This leaves room for error when the desire is abused. In my opinion, this is why Cults and religions can catch on so successfully when people add or take from the Bible for their own profit. For example the “children of god” cult that abuses the name of Jesus for sexual exploitation but completely ignores the Bible talks about sexual purity and lust.

Be careful when leaders knowingly make a deviation from the Word for their own intents or profits. If someone takes the frame and fills it with their own opinion and junk, take caution. Learn but judge and do your own fact checking. Acts 17:11

Compromises – This last caution may be subjective. I believe a church should never compromise on their convictions and their faith. It should not be bended to societal influence or what is “acceptable” to man. This applies to what is good, just, and true. Accepting a lie doesn’t make it anymore true and any less hurtful. One should not accept compromise in their faith or conscience. However neither should we expect everyone to agree with our convictions or believes and neither should we force such believes upon others unwillingly. God gave man free will, shouldn’t we respect their free will as well?  (1 Peter 3:15)

Living in society with different believes requires acceptance but not compromises. Yes, compromise is necessary in daily life for a cohesive society though compromises should never be about Truths or facts.

 

Every individual is unique and different. Take the metaphor of plants, one plant may grow better in red soil with higher iron while another plant may grow better in soft, fertile soil with a lot of peat. I hope you find a good church in Vancouver and you enjoyed this article.

Note while denomination should not be a divisive factor, we have noted it because denomination represent slight differentiation in interpretation of certain scriptures or preferred style of worship. I find you may be more familiar or comfortable with a church that matches your denomination (upbringing or preference) enabling for fellowship in your community.

The purpose of this list is to help new Christians in Vancouver find a church they can get connected to and begin living life, growing, and serving the community and city at large.

UBC Prospective Undergraduate

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So you’ve applied to UBC and you’re awaiting for your admission decision.

It’s quite a nerve racking process; I remember four years back applying for UBC as my first choice for post secondary studies. Why UBC? There are many excellent universities to choose from in British Columbia. To name a few you have UBC, SFU, UBC-O, UVIC, UNBC, Langara, TWU.

 

Personally:

Yet my choice for UBC came while in high school in BC. I liked their campus. You really get to appreciate and enjoy the beauty of Vancouver.

Next, I like the large campus. UBC has a huge campus and almost like a city of itself, it makes for good exploring and things to do. Importantly, in my opinion, it’s part of the university process. To have somewhere away enough from your norm to experience something different. It’s an incentive to live on campus which is part of the experience you get at university (I’m of the inclination that university is more than education but the networks and experience you build).

Finally, I chose UBC because of the community. I like a big university with a big international community. It introduces thoughts and allows you to intermingle with other cultures and people. It’s interesting and it’s vibrant.

I’m not saying UBC is the university for you (there are a lot of difficult people there too lol), those are simply some of the reasons why I appreciated UBC (there’s lot of eagles too!).

And BTW heads up, the picturesque photo they use in marketing UBC, IS NOT WHAT YOU ACTUALLY SEE…you know what I’m talking about. The sunny rose garden over looking the ocean and mountains. That’s real. It’s by the flag pole past Koerner and Sauder school of business. The sunny weather? Comes once every 7 days in the months from November to March 🙂

 

Who is this for:

Who is this article for? Well it’s for you, the one reading because you’ve applied to UBC. You’re a UBC Prospective Undergraduate. Congrats 🙂

 

Firstly, this article is more so intended for the international community coming to Vancouver to study at UBC. I hope it’ll help you get started and know what you can find in Vancouver. Feel free to browse this site for other information about Vancouver from a local’s view point.

 

Next, let me get this out there. I really enjoy meeting people and I enjoy helping people. I enjoy inviting and welcoming people and sharing any experience we can (partly the reason for VancityAsks.com). It’s something intuitive and something I enjoy (yes I used that word a lot). I find it exciting quite honestly.

We at VancityAsks.com would like to extend our genuine assistance for you moving from another country for your studies. If you have any questions about Vancouver please reach out and comment bellow! If you need a ride from the airport, we can help you too. (free) We just really enjoy welcoming people to this amazing city, even at our own expense of time and gas! Basically, this is a formal suggestion that we’d be happy to help you with your transition to Vancouver however we can at VancityAsks.com

 

Now, who else would be interested in reading this?

It’s for you who are still closing near the end of your high school education and looking for something to read while you procrastinate.

It’s for you who grew up in the suburbs of Vancouver (like me) in Coquitlam or maybe Port Coquitlam (good on you – your commute must be enjoyable) who perhaps may not know what Vancouver has to offer.

It’s for you, who’s perhaps currently in Singapore or New York and want to know more about what to expect in Vancouver and UBC.

 

Why is this on VancityAsks.com?

VancityAsks.com is a local question and answer site for Vancouver. We want to discover the best Vancouver has to offer. When you ask, where’s the best pizza in Vancouver, we have the answer from a first-hand local experience. When you’re wondering where you can get the best sushi in Vancouver? We got you covered. Something you’ll come really accustom to is drinking coffee and we also share the best coffee in Vancouver.

So it seems fitting that we also uncover our own experiences about UBC and I hope it’ll help in some way at all with your transition to university. We’re also writing this to get some likes here:

http://www.facebook.com/VancityAsks

 

What to expect:

The waiting process can be frustrating can’t it. I remember refreshing the UBC SSC again on a daily basis waiting for my admission. UBC goes on a rolling admission base on your application strength (the best application gets approved first). My grades weren’t so good, and so my application was the latter to be approved. Foolishly or maybe faithfully, UBC was the only school I applied for haha.

Once you’ve gotten your offer, really consider if you think UBC will be the best option for you economically and personally. (There are some really amazing people and professors at UBC although there are also the fair share of ummm. yeah.)

Now once you’re admitted and you’ve accepted your offer of admission. Up and coming for international students is Jump Start in August. I’ve talked to a lot of friends while at first year residence about their jump start experience and some loved it and some did not like it so much. It is a great way to make friends though. I knew some who simply came early to Vancouver with their family and explored the city together.

When school starts in September, the first week (and even the second) is really relax. It’s a great time to meet new people and get involved with on campus activities. Go to imagine day and check out the (student) club days later on.

Honestly speaking, this video is quite accurate to many experience of their four years at UBC (with some exceptions):

If you’re a keener, it can be definitely worth while to get involve in student government.

Apply to be the first year representative of your faculty student association. I’ve notice, it seems those who go on to further positions in the student government are typically first year reps. I would think because they have the experience, rapport, and network/familiarity to be elected for other positions.

So if you intend on being in the student government later on, be the keener in the first year and apply as a first year rep. I don’t think you get paid for being a first year rep (I was quite an introvert so it wasn’t my bid) but if I’m not mistake the higher positions later in student government do pay quite reasonably.

Also in my humble opinion, if you want to run for student president some time in your 4 years at university and score that $30,000+ salary for the year…you should know, it’s a lot of a popularity contest than a merits in some level. Most of the people who become student president have strong marketing campaigns and are typically part of frats or large clubs (whose members then help with word of mouth pushing for votes). As a voter, inform yourself of each individual platform and vote purposefully.

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Budget-2013.pdf

Student execs are being paid what?

Learning also comes in different ways as cliche as it sounds. I wasn’t quite the fan of in-class learning and haven’t done so well in my classes (mostly those that I didn’t like) although keep reading outside of class on what interest you. Many of you I know are likely going through university to check that box for a degree. I’ve spoken to many who have gone on to do careers in things outside of their degree scope.

I personally find that university is essential not for the rigid academics (many of which you won’t actually use outside your classroom unless you pursue academia) particularly but for the life skills, experience, and networks.

Go figure this one out, “Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.”

That’s pretty much it I suppose in terms of expectation for your first year. Know also that the point above leads to the next, your grades are important but look at it with perspective. Many people (myself included) got really stress about first year grades. It doesn’t really hit you as much until probably 3 months into your first year when you realize relative to others, you appear behind.

Your 90%+ you got in high school is rare in university. Attaining a B is quite a feat for certain classes. Look at the grade distribution here (you’ll need your SSC login now it appears – previously you could access it public):

https://cas.id.ubc.ca/ubc-cas/login?TARGET=https%3A%2F%2Fwebprd01.pair.ubc.ca%2Freports%2Fgradesdist_request.action

You have pretty much everything you need on campus if you choose to live on residence but do take the time to explore Vancouver outside of UBC. UBC is situated to the west of Vancouver in the Point Grey community. It’s near by two communities: (1) Kitsilano – Otherwise known as Kits, check out the beaches, cafes, and eateries. You will find good coffee and donuts at 49th Parallel Coffee shop. You’ll find a beach (you can actually walk there from UBC through Spanish Banks if you’re up for a hike). You’ll find hippy stores. (2) Kerrisdale – It’s a nice, small community you arrive taking the 41 bus or the 43 bus. Here you’ll find good sushi and a nice family orientated neighborhood.  UBC is also 30 minutes from downtown Vancouver by transit for your downtown Vancouver adventures.

Follow Ricardo Seah for his downtown Vancouver adventures: https://www.facebook.com/ricardoseah

Read this Vancouver guide by Alvin Yu:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/alvin-yu/yus-guide-to-everything-vancouver/10151434883321618

Both are UBC students above. Well Alvin, went on to Edmonton to study at University of Alberta.

 

Some tips:

  • Go for the orientation. Go for the campus tours. Make those friends and networks. I attended several UBC events while in high school and it was really useful for me personally. Many of the seniors are very glad to share their experience and they are really friendly (contrary to a “friend” I remembered who told me if they knew we were from high school, we’d be scorned at the events – hence think for yourself.) Imagine what a easier transition it would be if you’ve met a few in your program (or one you wanted to transfer into 😉  ) who could tell you about courses and professors to expect. Imagine how much easier it would be to make friends if you could recognize people you met before on campus and get introductions. Imagine how much easier it is for positions at (student) clubs or events if you knew the individuals from a previous encounter. Networking isn’t only exclusive to a specific study. It’s a general good and it’s always nice to make meaningful relationships. Be genuine.
  • The AMS has some nice paid positions for the student government that can be worth applying for. IMHO if you’re looking some extra income, get involve in student government early on and build upwards. Also for international students, if I’m not mistaken you’re allow to work on campus without a work permit:http://students.ubc.ca/career/resources/working-canadaThe AMS does hire for a lot of position and UBC has quite a bit of programs to encourage on campus hiring. It appears you can work off campus too up to 20 hours.
  • Honestly, your first year grade doesn’t matter as much (it does matter) but there’s no point beating yourself up if you didn’t do as good as you expected when you first considered your goals. Sometimes our self expectation can be unrealistic. It’s sad to read occasionally about suicides because of grades that occur in university (and in certain south east asian countries). You have so much potential, you’re admitted into one of the top universities in Canada; you have other skills and gifting so be able to look beyond your grades but for where it matters, you’re paying (or your parents are paying) $10k/year for your studies so do make the most of it.The part it matters is largely with course selection for the second year. Your GPA determines your time for course registration; you want the good courses and good professors. Professors do matter a lot to your learning. Most the professors in the Math, Computer Science, and Economics department are amazing. (with a few exceptions)Study what you enjoy and take some GPA boosters 🙂 I use to think GPA boosters was a waste of credits but they do help and they do matter. Check with the grade distribution link I posted above and choose GPA boosters if you need it. Good GPA boosters are typically intro foreign language courses of course it depends on your bent as well.

 

Final thoughts:

University is an exciting time and a time of transition. You can waste it away or you can make the most of it; we suggest you consider what you hope to get out from your 4 years (or five) and go for it.

It cannot be understated but genuinely choose your friends carefully. Yes, it’s a time where many fool around and reckless decisions but it can also be a time for growth and genuine understanding of who you are. Will you use this four years for your life as a platform or will it be a waste?

Honestly, the programs are such that you can easily make it through without really getting much from your education but why would you? Lastly, control your thoughts and your consciousness. (don’t lose your chooser – don’t let others choose for you. Don’t listen to propaganda. Think for your life and be productive to society. We’re neighbors for a reason.)

I hope you’ll enjoy your university experience whether at UBC or wherever else you go. If you plan on studying in Vancouver from another country, please feel free to reach out to us at VancityAsks.com and we’ll be happy to help however possible. (whether be it question, or being a line of support, or a ride from the airport to your destination – if schedule permits. I may be in and out of Vancouver). Also follow VancityAsks.com to learn more about Vancouver!

 

I’ll probably update this article later when I feel like it; meanwhile after a straight 2 hours of writing, I’m simply going to post as-is. It’s not a graded essay after all. Please leave your comments and thoughts and suggestions. I’m sure there are many others who can provide better tips than these so please do!