Complete Food/Restaurant Guide – UBC Area

Share this with your Vancouver friends:

Welcome to UBC – A Place of Mind.

Right now, we’re going to put your mind on food which is critically important for you to be mindful. 😉

If you’re coming to UBC for your post-secondary education, you will appreciate this detailed and complete food guide for various food choices you have at UBC. Scroll to the bottom for quick picks and cheap eats at UBC. This page will save you money and save you wasted calories trying low-quality food…there are plenty on campus. There are also plenty of good food on campus. So take the highway and avoid the pitfalls with restaurants at UBC by reading this complete UBC foods guide.

 

Don’t Forget about freshman 15:

Many think that Freshman 15 is just a myth. As a university freshman 5 years ago, you can bet there’s plenty of truth to it. Perhaps, the distance from family, the stress of moving, the busyness of studying/cramming for exams/essays is compensated by the comfort and familiarity of food. Perhaps, the lack of time and lack of time management (personally for me at least.) results in eating high calorie but nutritionally low foods. (which also happens to often be the default foods we eat when stress – potato chips, chocolates, ramen noodles?.) Perhaps, the convenience of food on campus and your meal plan dollars results in consistent and frequent eating. (You will be happy to know Totem Park Magdas has a burger ordering open till around 1 AM. Domino’s Pizza regularly delivers till 3 AM. A&W + Macdonalds at the village is 24/7.)

Whatever the cause, you can be assured without proper intention, you will be putting on weight in you freshman year. Make an intentional effort to eat healthy, exercise, and be mindful of how you are fueling your body for success.

Of course everyone is different, deals with stress/emotions differently, and metabolizes calories differently. (jealous of those who can eat whatever they want and not seem to put on weight?)

 

Food at UBC:

There are plenty of food choices at UBC. You have eateries all across campus. A large amount of these eateries are owned and operated either by your student society (AMS) or UBC Food Services. There are also many private businesses congregating along the Nest, UBC Village, and Wesbrook.

The list will be categorized by location for convenient sorting rather than by cuisine. Information provided includes (1) Price (2) Rating (3) Comments + Must-try/Avoid.

We are going to categorize an entire list of every possible food spot you can find at UBC campus. We will also share some notable eateries in neighboring communities to UBC such as Point Grey, Sasamat, and Kerrisdale.

Lastly, find our quick pick recommendations at the bottom of the list along with some tips for freshman looking to cook in their dorms 😉 (I was one of the three Asians in Shuswap who cooked in their dorm. It was more so a stress reliever, social activity, and healthy nutrition than it was money saving. I got bored of the assembly line food at the student resident and wanted a difference… home-cook taste. Also had fond memories of meeting with a group of Singaporeans at UBC and cooking Chinese New Year dinner at someone’s home in Marpole. Simple food but a refreshment from mass-prepared store bought foods.)

 

On UBC Campus: You’re not short on options at UBC campus for foods. You have everything from sushi to pizza. Most food places in the center of campus where the faculty buildings, research labs, and libraries are located, are operated by UBC Foods Services. There is quite a variety of foods but some similarities too. We will group these into “central campus”. There are a few UBC eateries on the outskirts of the campus, North and South such as Bean Around the World or The Great Dame coffee. These are privately operated coffee shops located around the residential portions of UBC; we will list these under “Around UBC”. Finally, the other two spots you will find most food choices are University Village and Wesbrook Village. Notably, the Save on Foods you will frequent often is at Wesbrook village which is about 20 minutes walk from the Nest or a 5 minute bus ride. There is a nearer, Shoppers Drug Mart by the dentistry building which is no more than 5 minutes from the Nest. We will use the Nest as a reference point of distance to any eateries mentioned as that’s most central to the new bus loop (hopefully skytain will be coming) and a popular gathering point for students.

Unfortunately with the departure of the SUB (replaced by the NEST), some popular and favourite dining choices have been demolish. This included the Korean food store in the basement of the NEST along with the Fridays 50% off deal at the Delly.

The sad and notable part of UBC foods is that the cheapest and most consistent food comes usually from franchises operated by UBC foods. Something has to be done about residents’ dining hall that charges restaurant prices for cafeteria foods. Indeed, it’s great sometimes – the food is good occasionally however drastically over priced when you factor in the maintenance cost within you resident dining plans (as I remembered paying $4 for a slice of cake, $2 for bottled drinks, $2 for milk, about $5 for protein – chicken breast or small slice of fish added with $2-$3 for carbs works each meal easily to $10-$12.) They also do not provide you a receipt unless requested (unless this has changed since) which often you find the occasional mistaken charge. It also does not allow you to properly identify how you’re spending your meal dollars and make for better spending choices/budgeting. I think you should always request a receipt; even if it may take a little extra time. It is good to make a habit of understanding and associating your costs to your goods/purchases. It’s a life skill and I am of the opinion – more than what you learn in university with concepts/theory – is the network, friendships, and life skills you’ve built. With the advancement of technology, the rapid changes in society, many things you learn may not be relevant 10 or 20 years down the road but the life skills you learn are important. To learn how to manage your time. To learn how to deal with extra pressure. To learn how to take things lightly and in perspective – learn to relax and do your best.  So with this said, I think resident dining hall should always offer the receipt rather than only providing the receipt upon request (with a grudging response) because students and society need to always associate the cost to the value. Many in society today are delusional because they know their wants but don’t recognize the costs that has been associate to their wants and pursuits. The freedom we have at the cost of those who have fought for our freedom; the brave man and women who served in the armed forces (instead today, many look at them with disdain). The opportunity for us to study because our parents believed in the power/value of education and were willing to make sacrifices and planning to ensure that we could gain an education because they believed it was the right path for us. The opportunity to live in a civilized and operational society with modern comforts because of those who have gave their life publicly to navigate policies with vision. When we learn to realize the costs to everything, we become a more grateful society and more effective in our pursuits. We also learn to appreciate those who have gone before us to pave the way, to repay their kindness and repay it on wards rather than complaining and being self absorbed in our world or in our own pleasures. Look outwards, not inwards. Your fulfillment in life will come from serving others. However, you also need realistic and pragmatic approach to know you need to improve and care for yourself first.

That was a bit of a discourse but I think our society today has become so self absorb. We don’t appreciate but are quick to judge public servants. A militant approach to any discontentment. Let’s be a more generous and gracious society.

 

Central Campus: Here entails all the faculty building dining spots including two student residents dining halls/cafe, one Starbucks franchises, and two Tim Horton franchises.

 

Around UBC:

 

Bus Loop:

 

University Village: Officially known as University Marketplace, University Village is just a 5 minutes walk from The NEST and right besides Regent College. The village as it’s also otherwise known consists of private rental apartments, a basement food court, and retail shops ranging from dry cleaning to printing services; but what we’re really interested in is the food! There’s plenty of UBC Village food choices here.

One More Sushi:

Price:

Rating:

Comments:

Click here for a map of Bubble Waffle Cafe, University Village restaurant. Pictures of Bubble Waffle Cafe is available here. A menu is available here.

Visit Bubble Waffle Cafe on Yelp or Zomato for more feedback!

 

Suga Sushi:

Price:

Rating:

Comments: Generally avoid Suga Sushi if you’re looking for good UBC sushi. The prices are comparable to sushi places on and off campus but the quality, freshness, and taste is far bellow standards. The Korean food is supposedly good but generally you will find better food on campus elsewhere. It is one of the few Korean restaurants at UBC.

 

Mcdonald’s:

 

Bubble Waffle Cafe:

Price:

Rating:

Comments:

Click here for a map of Bubble Waffle Cafe, University Village restaurant. Pictures of Bubble Waffle Cafe is available here. A menu is available here.

 

Visit Bubble Waffle Cafe on Yelp or Zomato for more feedback!

 

Omio Japan:

 

NEST: Located within the NEST are plenty of options for dining on campus from sit-in to fast casual dining options for take out.

 

Wesbrook Village:

 

Near UBC Campus:

 

Quick Pick and Cheap Eats:

Best food at UBC:

 

Best Pizza at UBC:

 

Best Sushi at UBC:

 

Cheap and good food at UBC:

 

 

Share this with your Vancouver friends:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *